whitsun dove kite craft activity

Art & Crafts
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whitsun craft

The festival of Whitsun is often celebrated in Waldorf schools by wearing white, making doves or daisy chains and coming together to sing, play games or tell stories in different languages as a symbol of peace and unity.  It is also a celebration of all the different cultures within a diverse community, and spreading love and a spirit of understanding into the world.  Doves during Whitsun time represent the connection between Heaven, Father Sun and the Earth and the spreading of peace and love. Children in Waldorf schools are often invited to connect with this symbolism through making dove craft activities.

We also have the journal ‘Celebrating Whitsun Festival and Whitsun Season Table Ideas‘ for more ideas for this time.

whitsun dove kite craft

Here we have instructions on how to make a Whitsun Dove Kite to fly high in the sky on these breezy summer days and connect with the symbolism through play, no other explanation is necessary for young children, the wonder of making their own bird that really flies will hold all the magic and awe for them!  It has 12 tongues of fire as a tail which not only looks wonderful flying in the wind but also is to represent how, in the Bible story, Whitsun originated from the Holy Spirit appearing as tongues of fire to the twelve disciples enabling them to then speak in all languages and communicate to all. We love this fiery tail flying!

whitsun dove kite

how to make a whitsun dove kite
  1. You will need either white Large Kite Paper, or white Tissue Paper, or Origami Lantern Paper White for the dove
  2. Coloured Tissue Paper in reds/oranges/yellows for the flaming tail
  3. White Paper Straws
  4. Paper Glue
  5. White Wool, Warp Yarn or String and a stick

 

whitsun dove kite

You can download this free Myriad Whitsun Dove Kite Template and print at a size to suit your white kite/tissue paper, and then trace the dove shape, or you can draw your own Whitsun dove.   Fold the paper down the middle, draw your dove on one side, (tummy and beak facing the centre fold) then turn over and trace it on the other side (the paper should be thin enough to see the drawing through it).   When you have finished drawing both sides and open it out the dove should be mirrored on both sides of the centre fold like above.

Then fold the paper back in half again and then fold along the slanted dotted lines shown above, mark the circles for tying your string through and cut out the dove from the paper (keeping it joined along the centre fold where the beaks, tummies and tails meet).

whitsun dove kite

Then place a paper straw along the middle fold (as above) and cut two pieces to size that fit where the two halves of the dove join (1 for the tummy area and one for tail area).  Glue these paper straw pieces to the middle fold.

whitsun dove

Next make a T-shape out of 2 paper straws (or could cut it from thin cardboard) and use paper and glue to secure the T at the point the straws meet. Use a piece of tissue paper and glue to secure the ‘T’ to each side of the wings as shown above.  Make sure you have also folded the dove body along the slanted fold and the wings spread out each side as shown.

whitsun dove kite

Find a stick and tie some white yarn or string to the centre of the stick.  Then wrap the yarn around the stick – at least 3 or 4 metres length in length – the longer the higher your kite can fly!  Then tie the other end through the holes marked on the template on the chest of the dove and tying around the straw glued along the folded dove body.

whitsun dove kite

To finish your Whitsun Dove Kite, glue 12 lengths of tissue paper in oranges, reds and yellows, each about 1.5cm wide, to the base of the T-frame so it can make the flaming flying tail.  Then it’s time to take it outside and let it fly!

whitsun dove

Run along with just a short length of yarn first to help let it catch the breeze…

whitsun dove

The Whitsun Dove really flies!! So magical!!

whitsun dove

Even little ones can have a go – it was luckily so easy to fly…

whitsun dove

whitsun dove

A really lovely craft and then fun play afterwards full of wonder…. we felt like we were really touching the sky….in the magical realm between Father Sun and Mother Earth…

whitsun dove

whitsun dove

If you have a go, please feel free to contact us or share your images with us on social media – we would love to see! Please keep in touch through Facebook, Instagram and our Myriad Meetinghouses – on Facebook go to our page and then select Groups and ask to join, on Instagram: @myriadmeetinghhouse

We would love to see all your ideas for home activities with children – please tag us! #myriadnaturaltoys #myriadmoment #myriadmakes #myriadmail

 

 

With our journal posts and social media posts on festivals of the year, Myriad wishes to share ideas that can inspire families and other groups to add richness to their lives. We are inspired by communities that share the Anthroposophical impulse, such as Waldorf education. The festivals we partake in and share ideas about may contain elements from different spiritual streams that interweave to give us spiritual nourishment today. Myriad do not wish to suggest any particular stream is better or more important than any other, or exclude, or relegate. We want to share festival traditions that we believe will support, encourage and reinforce our connection to nature and to something much greater than ourselves. We believe the terrain is the same for all of us, we just use different ‘maps’. As Rudolf Steiner said “Love is higher than opinion”. We hope that the ‘universal truths’ that radiate through many traditions can be recognised, thereby enriching us culturally and spiritually.

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